Researching Your Piano

Standard Regulation:
$45hr Labor
*Materials added extra as needed*
*Some materials may need to be ordered*


The piano is a complex instrument. There are many parts that must work together in order for it to make a sound. From the key of the piano to the hammer is called the ‘action’. From point to point there are, roughly, 59 parts that all work together. When you add all 88 keys, these parts add up.

There comes a time when parts wear out and need to be repaired or simply replaced. Periodic adjustments can reduce repair and replacement of your piano's parts especially if you have a technician tune and inspect your piano every 6 months. Most repairs can be spotted just by noticing if the feel of the key action is uneven, sticking or squeaking. Other things to listen for are clicks, rattles or buzzing sounds.

Solutions are not just limited to the action for these problems. A trained piano technician knows what to look and listen for. Most often the solution can be adjusted in the ‘action’ and on occasion in the ‘trap’ (pedal mechanisms) of the piano. Feel free to discuss any concerns you may have with your technician. Do not attempt to do any 'home repairs'. One single mistake can be costly. A trained piano technician has the tools, parts and experience to do the job right the first time.

Must be done in person :
Cost: 10% piano's value

The 'Blue Book" value of a piano is important when selling, buying or insuring your piano. Research if appraisals is based on information from Libraries, Retailers, Factories, Auction Houses and Registration Specialists.

The reason an in home inspection is necessary is because ALL factors are taken into consideration. Tone quality, cabinet condition, regulation performance, brand name and consumer ratings.

The 'Blue Book" value of a piano is important when selling, buying or insuring your piano. Research of appraisals is based on information from Libraries, Retailers, Factories, Auction Houses and restoration specialists.

The reason an in home inspection is necessary is because ALL factors are taken into consideration. Tone quality, cabinet condition, regulation performance, consumer ratings and brand name recognition are important and can only be applied to the appraisal after inspection.

It is important to have your piano appraised for insurance purposes. If it is a rare piano it may not be replaceable if damages or destroyed. Contact Stephen Weidner at 303-353-2973 or email hammered@comcast.net for more information.

Regulation

All done by Email:
$5.00
* Correct information is needed. This is very important.

* Make of your piano. You'll find it on the fallboard or plate inside your piano.

* Serial number of your Piano. This is generally found on the pin block on the inside of your piano. Simply lift the lid to find the location inside. You may have to remove the music desk or topfront panel.

* All information will be gathered from the Pierce Piano Atlas and sent to you via mail as a document you can use for appraisals and insurance purposes.

* Please write down the information on a sheet of paper (include check or money order for $5.00) or email to:

Stephen Weidner – Piano Technician
Piano Research
13973 East Utah Circle
Aurora, Colorado
80012
or email information to:
Hammered@comcast.net

Tuning

Tips and Services for your piano

Services

Spinet * Console * Studio * Upright * Grand * Square Grand * Player
Tuning
Voicing
Regulation
Felting
Hammer Reconditioning
Hammer Replacements
Key Top Replacements
Broken String Repair
Restringing
Pin Block Repair

Appraisals

88 Hammers

$125
All tunings include an inspection and light internal cleaning.

*****Special Pitch Tuning Available*****
A439, A440, A441, A442
(Please specify while making appointment)

*****Special Tempering Available*****
Classical, Rock, Jazz
(Please specify while making appointment)

Pitch Raising:Set appointment for estimate.
Generally this requires (within a 3 month period):
1st appointment: Initial raising and tuning.
2nd appointment: Possible additional raising plus tuning.
3rd appointment: Final pitch adjustment and tempered tuning


Tuning a piano is a major event for the piano, itself. There are a lot of factors to take into consideration. The average piano has 224 strings. The middle and upper sections carry, roughly, 160 pounds of pressure per square inch. You can easily add another 15% for the bass section. Adding this all up can easily reach 12-15 tons of pressure if the piano is tuned to concert pitch, A440.

Each time the piano is tuned the pressure changes and adjusts as the strings are being raised or lowered. This amount of tension and pressure is felt throughout the entire piano. A constant pitch reverberation will stabilize and establish the 'voice' of the instrument. Any registered and certified piano technician will recommend that your piano be tuned every 6 months to a year to avoid release of tension and lowering of pitch. Not maintaining a regulated tuning can lead to costly repairs on the capo, stagger pins, bridge, sound board, hitch pins and frame.

The technician is trained on tempering the piano for tuning. This tempering sets the tone for the entire piano. A qualified technician can also adjust any mistakes set by previous tuners. This tempering helps sustain the quality and sound of your investment if maintained on a regular basis. In doing so the piano should last many generations and bring years of performance satisfaction. EVERY piano has the ability to sound its best when maintained and handled by a certified piano technician.

Voicing

Standard Voicing:
$100 - Spinet / Upright / Grand
*Service is done ‘in home’*

Just as each of us has our own distinct voice, so does a piano. The ‘voice’ starts when the hammer strikes the string. Over time the felt hammers become compressed, or hardened, and can even develop imprints of the strings.  No matter how much a person uses dynamics these compressed hammers will sound harsh, hard to change dynamically and not strike the string correctly. It becomes difficult to create expression.
An indication voicing may be needed is a bright or harsh sound. Some hammers will develop more harshness than others creating an uneven tone quality. A trained technician can align, shape, harden or soften a hammer to create an even tonal quality. Before this is done, however, the technician must make sure the temper and regulation of the piano is set before a proper voicing can take place.
Questions to ask yourself:
*Does the tone sound even across the keyboard?
*Does the piano sound different from when it was first acquired?
*Does the piano still sound bad after tuning?
*Is there a difference in tone quality from soft to loud dynamics?

Stephen Weidner - Piano Technician